The Forum concluded with Waterlution’s workshop “Ideas to Networks to Actions”

Ideas to Networks to Actions engaged participants in developing additional possibilities for celebrating, protecting and promoting the Great Lakes. Participants were invited to consider and offer ideas on these and other questions in breakout sessions:

  • How can engagement in existing efforts be broadened and strengthened?
  • What innovations and new ideas might there be?
  • How can connections among groups and individuals be strengthened and sustained?

Participants included representatives of Canadian and United States federal, state and provincial government agencies, tribal governments, First Nations, Métis, municipal governments, watershed management agencies, other local public agencies, and the public.

The Workshop Process

  • Connector.

    Round 1 - Ideas

    The first round of dialogue asked “Now what?”. Attendees were invited to use their creativity and think of the ideas they had heard (or had not heard) that they felt were so powerful they will have a strong impact on keeping the Great Lakes healthy, protected and celebrated for centuries to come. Participants were invited to consider which parts of these ideas already existed, and what could potentially change moving forward. Attendees were asked to categorize their ideas under: Conservation, Celebration, Art, Sport, Indigenous, Youth, Industry, Data, Technology, Community, Restoration, Protection, Monitoring, Recreation, and other.

  • Connector.

    Round 2 - Networks

    The second round of the workshop focused on networks. Attendees were invited to think about who the action leaders are in the Great Lakes, who is present, who is missing and how their ideas could be made more interesting so as to encourage others to become involved.

  • Connector.

    Round 3 - Outcomes

    The last round focused on steps to bridge the process from ideas to outcomes. Participants were asked to list three short-tem actions that people could support and three long-term actions that require more time and coordination.

  • Connector.

    Round 1 - Ideas

    The first round of dialogue asked “Now what?”. Attendees were invited to use their creativity and think of the ideas they had heard (or had not heard) that they felt were so powerful they will have a strong impact on keeping the Great Lakes healthy, protected and celebrated for centuries to come. Participants were invited to consider which parts of these ideas already existed, and what could potentially change moving forward. Attendees were asked to categorize their ideas under: Conservation, Celebration, Art, Sport, Indigenous, Youth, Industry, Data, Technology, Community, Restoration, Protection, Monitoring, Recreation, and other.

  • Connector.

    Round 2 - Networks

    The second round of the workshop focused on networks. Attendees were invited to think about who the action leaders are in the Great Lakes, who is present, who is missing and how their ideas could be made more interesting so as to encourage others to become involved.

  • Connector.

    Round 3 - Outcomes

    The last round focused on steps to bridge the process from ideas to outcomes. Participants were asked to list three short-tem actions that people could support and three long-term actions that require more time and coordination.